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New clues, New hope of unlocking mystery of ill-fated MH370

Details are seen for a liquid soap container label, marked Jakarta - Indonesia, that was part of newly-discovered debris washed onto the beach at Saint-Andre on the French island of Reunion, July 31, 2015
Details are seen for a liquid soap container label, marked Jakarta - Indonesia, that was part of newly-discovered debris washed onto the beach at Saint-Andre on the French island of Reunion, July 31, 2015 REUTERS/Zinfos974/Prisca Bigot

New debris washed ashore on the island of Reunion have revived hopes of unlocking one of aviation's biggest mysteries. On Thursday, a badly damaged suitcase was found near the wreckage of a plane, believed to be from the missing Malaysia airliner MH370. Whilst on Friday, bottles carrying Chinese and Indonesian inscriptions were also discovered.

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Officials in Australia say they're increasingly confident that plane wreckage found off the French Indian ocean is from the missing Malaysia airline flight.

The debris washed up on Reunion island on Wednesday, some 4,000km from the area where MH370 is thought to have gone down.

Australian authorities have been coordinating the underwater search for the plane, which disappeared 16 months ago.

The discovery of the two-metre piece of wreckage, seemingly part of a wing, is being treated as a major lead in unlocking one of aviation's biggest mysteries.

On Thursday, hopes were raised further, when a badly damaged suitcase washed ashore. Then the following day the Indian ocean spat out more clues: two bottles carrying inscriptions in Chinese and Indonesian.

Most of the 239 passengers who were on the Malaysia Airlines flight were Chinese.

On March 8, 2014, the jetliner - a Boeing 777 travelling from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing - vanished without a trace.

The families of the victims have had many false alarms before, and this time are demanding tangible proof before getting their hopes up.

To shed light on the fate of their loved ones, the debris will be shipped to Toulouse on Friday evening, for a full examination by the BEA, France’s civil aviation and accident authority.

It's still unclear how the identification will be carried out. But Malaysian authorities are confident that the piece of wreckage discovered in Reunion on Wednesday, has the same identification number as a Boeing triple 7.

Confirming that the part is from MH370 would establish beyond any doubt that Flight 370 ended its journey in the Indian Ocean, and lay many unanswered questions to rest.

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