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International report

New Orleans series part 3/5

Audio 03:38
Worshippers decked in head-to-toe white gather before a statue of the voodoo priestess Marie Laveau as well as a shrine to the voodoo spirits, known as "loa".
Worshippers decked in head-to-toe white gather before a statue of the voodoo priestess Marie Laveau as well as a shrine to the voodoo spirits, known as "loa". Gregory Plesse
By: Richelle Harrison Plesse

New Orleans voodoo is not unlike the city's signature dish - a gumbo - a syncretism of African religious tradition and Catholicism from the region's French, Spanish and Creole populations. However, voodoo, long met with equal doses of fascination and disapproval, was for a long time practiced in secret, with people mistaking it for "black magic." A decade ago, Hurricane Katrina prompted a mass exodus of voodoo practitioners, many of whom never came back. But as Richelle Harrison Plesse reports, in recent years the city has seen a voodoo revival.

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