Culture

Paris' Carnavalet Museum to reopen after four-year renovation

The Carnavalet Museum in Paris closed in October 2016 and is due to re-open on 29th May 2021 after more than 4 years of extensive renovation.
The Carnavalet Museum in Paris closed in October 2016 and is due to re-open on 29th May 2021 after more than 4 years of extensive renovation. © AFP/Thomas Samson

Visitors will be able to once again enjoy the historical Carnavalet Museum in Paris from 29 May after more than four years of major renovations. It comes shortly after the planned reopening of France's cultural venues, closed since October due to Covid-19 restrictions.

Advertising

The Carnavalet Museum - History of Paris, the oldest museum dedicated to the city, is located inside two private mansions in the heart of the Marais area.

Several of its 16th century facades have been restored, notably those in the Cour des Drapiers and those on the street.

"Bringing the historic monument up to technical and regulatory standards was one of the objectives of the partial restoration in order to ensure that the building could function safely and in accordance with international standards," said a statement from Paris Musées, the body that manages the capital's museums.

Four years of work and 58.3 million euros (94.5% financed by the City of Paris) were required to complete this restoration, which also concerned the 3,800 works newly presented.

Around one hundred professionals have been busily restoring all the works on display and redesigning the museum tour. In order to tell the story of Paris, many works have been taken out of storage: 60% of them were not visible to the general public until now.

"The new tour, built for the first time along a continuous chronological thread, reveals its greatest historical treasures from prehistory to the present day," the document continues.

Marcel Proust's room at the Musée Carnavalet in Paris
Marcel Proust's room at the Musée Carnavalet in Paris © Musée Carnavalet

In addition to author Marcel Proust's room, the public will be able to see new rooms such as those dedicated to the Renaissance or the Middle Ages. 

A special effort has been made to make it an educational experience, with 10% of the works installed at a child’s height, and explanations in English and Spanish.

A temporary exhibition will be held from 15 June entitled Henri Cartier-Bresson - Revoir Paris which aims to "highlight the importance of Paris in the life of one of the greatest French photographers of the 20th century".

Access to the museum and its collections remains free but booking a ticket online is compulsory due to the Covid-19 restrictions.

Daily newsletterReceive essential international news every morning