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EU turns back the clock on daylight savings

The Prague astronomical clock  was installed in 1410 nd is the oldest functioning astronomical clock in the world.
The Prague astronomical clock was installed in 1410 nd is the oldest functioning astronomical clock in the world. Godot13/CC/Wikimedia
2 min

The European Parliament has voted to end daylight saving – the one-hour clock change that extends daylight hours during the summer.

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The biannual clock changes that became law back in 1996 are due to end in 2021, when EU countries will decide whether they to want to permanently remain on winter or summer time.

The European Commission made the proposal last year, after a Europe-wide poll revealed that 84 percent of respondents were in favour of clocks staying the same throughout the year.

 But concerns were raised that a confusing patchwork of timezones would be created if some states opted to remain on "summer time" and some on "winter time".

Member states will be expected to coordinate their choices to avoid economic disruption.

If the draft law is approved by the EU executive and member states, countries will decide whether to remain permanently on what is now summer or winter time.

" We're waiting for member states to coordinate their decisions," warned Swedish MEP Marita Ulvskog, who is guiding the reform through the legislature.

The decisions will not now come into effect before 2021 after the European Parliament voted by 410 votes to 192 to push back the timetable. 

In the meantime, the European Council, which represents member states -- and experts from the European Commission will discuss the text with lawmaker

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