France - Egypt

EgyptAir wreckage found north of Alexandria

An image grab taken from a handout video released by the Egyptian Defence Ministry on May 20, 2016 shows the Egyptian military taking part in a search mission in the Mediterranean Sea for the remains of an EgyptAir plane which crashed on May 19
An image grab taken from a handout video released by the Egyptian Defence Ministry on May 20, 2016 shows the Egyptian military taking part in a search mission in the Mediterranean Sea for the remains of an EgyptAir plane which crashed on May 19 HO / AFP EGYPTIAN DEFENCE MINISTRY /
2 min

Egypt's military found wreckage Friday from the EgyptAir plane that crashed in the Mediterranean as investigators tried to unravel the mystery of why it swerved suddenly and plummeted into the sea. 

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Search teams spotted personal belongings of passengers and parts of the Airbus A320 about 290 kilometres (180 miles) north of Egypt's coastal city of Alexandria, the military spokesman said.

Egypt's aviation minister said on Thursday that a "terrorist attack" was a more likely cause than technical failure for the plane's disappearance from radar screens on a flight from Paris to Cairo with 66 people on board.

But French Foreign Minister Jean-Marc Ayrault said there was "absolutely no indication" of why the flight came down.

"We're looking at all possibilities, but none is being favoured over the others because we have absolutely no indication on the causes," he told French television.

The tragedy raised fears of a repeat of the bombing of a Russian passenger jet by the Islamic State jihadist group over Egypt last October that killed all 224 people on board.

In Cairo, French and Airbus investigators prepared to meet their Egyptian counterparts on Friday to lay the groundwork for their investigation.

The plane disappeared between Karpathos and the Egyptian coast in the early hours of Thursday morning, without its crew sending a distress signal.

Greek Defence Minister Panos Kammenos said the aircraft had swerved sharply twice in Egyptian airspace before plunging 22,000 feet (6,700 metres) and disappearing from radar screens.

 

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