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Second Wave

France records highest ever number of daily Covid-19 infections

People, wearing protective masks, walk near the Eiffel Tower, September 23, 2020. REUTERS/Charles Platiau
People, wearing protective masks, walk near the Eiffel Tower, September 23, 2020. REUTERS/Charles Platiau REUTERS - CHARLES PLATIAU
Text by: Jan van der Made with RFI
2 min

France’s latest figures show that 16,096 people were infected with the coronavirus over the last 24 hours, an increase of 3,024 cases compared to the previous day. Thursday's number is the highest ever in France since the start of the pandemic. The number of Covid-19 deaths in hospital rose to 52, up from 43 on Wednesday. 

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According to the website of the French health authorities, updated every evening, 6,5 percent of people tested were positive. This rate has been growing steadily over the past few days, from 4,1 percent in the week before.

The number of people who were hospitalised is also on the rise, with 4,258 recorded cases in the last week, with 718 in intensive care, an increase of 43 compared to the week before.

Latest figures show another record number of Covid-19 infections in France
Latest figures show another record number of Covid-19 infections in France © Santé Publique website screen grab

In spite of the growing numbers, authorities in Marseille called on the French government to suspend what they called “shocking” new sanitary measures that will force the closure of bars and restaurants in “maximum alert” zones including the Aix-Marseille area and Guadeloupe.

The new rules, announced on Wednesday, will see bars and restaurant in “maximum alert” zones – the threshold that precedes a state of sanitary emergency – completely close for two weeks from Saturday. They will also apply to any establishment receiving the public that does not have strict health protocols.

 

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