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Digital rights

EU court curbs mass phone data grab by spy agencies

The European Court of Justice puts limits on how European spy and security agencies could harvest personal data
The European Court of Justice puts limits on how European spy and security agencies could harvest personal data AFP
Text by: Jan van der Made with RFI
2 min

The EU's top court on Tuesday put limits on how European spy and security agencies could harvest troves of personal data, but said this could be done under a serious threat to national security.

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The Luxemburg based European Court of Justice said in a statement that "EU law precludes national legislation" that requires “electronic communication services” to carry out the "indiscriminate retention" of data.

However, it does allow for exemptions in cases of "serious threat to national security" or the "fight against serious crime", under the supervision of a judge or an independent administrative authority.

This lifting of the ban would have to be "limited in time to what is strictly necessary," the court added.

Loopholes

The decision will be closely looked at by privacy activists, like European Digital Rights, who fear wide loopholes that would allow unfettered data spying by state agencies.

Data privacy is a highly sensitive issue in Europe, where activists have put the legality of Facebook and other big tech operations into jeopardy over similar concerns.

The legal onslaught began after revelations by Edward Snowden of mass digital spying by US agencies that also revealed cooperation with Washington by the UK's spy agencies.

The mass harvesting of data is a central part of anti-terror laws passed in several Western countries in the wake of September 11 and other attacks.  

 

 

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